Archive | monsieur poulet

06 August 2018 ~ 0 Comments

Monsieur Poulet’s Mon Pirate

Mon Pirate by Amélie Graux is a lot of fun, delivering what feels like a child realizing his imaginary friend is real. The pirate ticks all the familiar boxes of his archetype with his massive scraggly beard, missing teeth, hook hand, tall hat and striped shirt. It’s a mixture of elements that could look scary, but instead feels cuddly and strangely sweet because of the artist’s skill and the way the colored pencil style has of making all the art feel a bit fuzzy. There’s a wonderful moment of mutual curiosity in the way the boy’s and pirate’s eyes meet, both seeming so excited to see each other. I also like the way the skull and crossbones on the hat is almost a third character in the arrangement with its big smile and similar size to the other two faces. One place where I think the art misses the boat, though, is in the hard edge of how the art cuts off at the bottom. I’d have rather seen the black of the pants eliminated entirely so that the art cuts off at the curving line of the belt, which I think would help the design to feel more natural and organic.

Winners at Monsieur Poulet earn 2 Euros per item sold, for a total of up to 2000 Euros.

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27 July 2018 ~ 0 Comments

Monsieur Poulet’s Pirate Volant

Pirate Volant by Maxime Derouen has an extremely enticing concept, combining a lot of childhood fantasies into one moment by showing a pirate child riding a giant bird, about to fly off to some distant locale. The large pirate flag on the saddle makes the design’s idea immediately clear, and the crisp, precise way each element is drawn (showing not just every feather, but every line in every feather) makes everything feel absolutely real, as though its ripped directly from a photograph. While the realism is a detraction in some places (like the line near the boy’s mouth that ages him bizarrely, or the flatness of each object’s edges), for the most part it makes the art feel more magical. A big strength in the design is that while the child is absolutely part of the action, his hat is the only thing really marking him as a pirate- the bird is the one to take on the lifestyle’s more serious consequences, like the eyepatch and peg leg. It helps confirm that what we’re seeing is a projection of this kid’s wild imagination, creating a surreal adventure.

Winners at Monsieur Poulet earn 2 Euros per item sold, for a total of up to 2000 Euros.

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16 July 2018 ~ 0 Comments

Monsieur Poulet’s Pouet

Pouet by Marion Piffaretti is done in the style of a child’s drawing, but has a lot more going on than those typically do. I like the way it starts out normally at the bottom, with drawings of people the artist knows. From there, though, things get more exotic, with several dogs, an odd rain scene, and even an elephant spicing things up. There are some interesting interactions that hint at a deeper story (like the strange way the yellow dog and orange cat regard each other, and the very different facial expressions of the characters in the umbrella sketch). And of course, the inclusion of Shrek, sitting top and center like the star on a Christmas tree, definitely catches the eye (especially since he is the only use of green in the entire piece). It’s a fun collection of moments to look at, both strange and sweet, and I like the way the wild meanderings in subject matter replicate the weird imagination of a child.

Winners at Monsieur Poulet earn 2 Euros per item sold, for a total of up to 2000 Euros.

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06 July 2018 ~ 0 Comments

Monsieur Poulet’s Belle Robe

Belle Robe by Maumont is a portrait of a character who seems to have the right priorities in life, having discarded his shoes to lay in the grass and drink wine. It’s a relaxed scene that feels peaceful and lighthearted, with a retro charm in the drawing style used that gives its protagonist a giant, round orange head that glows like the sun. The most brilliant moment of the scene is without question the wine glass’s stem, which in the French fellow’s eyes is the leafy stem of a plant, turning the glass’s bowl into a delicious, liquid blossom. Less successful for me is the inclusion of the shirt’s title written directly in the drawing. While I like the style with which it was done (especially the way it incorporates the wine cork), the phrase just doesn’t add anything to the design for me. As near as I can tell, it translates as Beautiful Dress, which isn’t terribly meaningful in how it reflects on the rest of the art. And just having it there detracts attention from the much better wine glass moment above. Even with that questionable call, though, the design remains very wearable and memorable.

Winners at Monsieur Poulet earn 2 Euros per item sold, for a total of up to 2000 Euros.

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28 June 2018 ~ 0 Comments

Monsieur Poulet’s Bang Bang

Bang Bang by Ludwick has a looseness that I really enjoy, because the frenetic, sketchy style of the art matches the chaos of the robbery scene it aims to create. I like the playfulness of the lettering, which has its word shown in all different angles and arrangements, altering each letter’s height to better curve around the other drawn elements. By keeping all the lettering in a slightly darker tone than the drawings, the art is able to quickly differentiate between sound and picture, making the crowded canvas read more clearly and expressively than one color might have. The one choice I take issue with is the decision to keep the art in a rectangle shape- I feel this takes away from the otherwise freeform, exciting look of the piece and gives the impression that it’s only been printed this way because of the constraints of the printing apparatus. One could argue, though, that it’s an accurate representation of the type of room the scene is happening in, so it probably isn’t a dealbreaker for most viewers. For me, the rectangle is a bit of a bummer, but it pales in comparison to the design’s strengths. In particular, I’m impressed with the way pointed edges repeat throughout the design- the stars, gun explosions, and money bag tops all have a similar shape to them, and it makes viewing this piece very subtly pleasing to the eye.

Winners at Monsieur Poulet earn 2 Euros per item sold, for a total of up to 2000 Euros.

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18 June 2018 ~ 0 Comments

Monsieur Poulet’s Incognito

Incognito by Anne Cécile OLEART is a real gem of a shirt. I love the flat, stylized look of the produce, which has an almost paper-cut sharpness and precision to it. This style allows each object to feel both like a symbol of the food it represents, but also (through use of not-quite-round circles and lines that bend) like unique specimens of their type. So while it has qualities of an educational aid, the illustrator’s hand can also be felt. You can see why this shirt was intended for children in the way it labels each item so carefully, but I think the quirkiness would also make it a fun design for adults, particularly because of how alien that sliced pear in the center looks. My only quibble this this piece is that I wish the labels were handwritten instead of using a font- I think a more playful touch on the lettering, allowing the words to bend around the objects they describe, would create a more dynamic look.

Winners at Monsieur Poulet earn 2 Euros per item sold, for a total of up to 2000 Euros.

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11 June 2018 ~ 0 Comments

Monsieur Poulet’s Groarrrr

Groarrrr by Ludwick is only available on child sizes, and you can see why this piece would be particularly popular with kids- it captures a sense of daring and adventure that suits childhood perfectly. But I think this design also has potential appeal beyond that group because of the choices made throughout the art. For instance, the onomatopoeia of the roar’s spelling, which adds a G at the start for a throaty bellow and an Rrr at the end to emphasize the growl. There’s also a neat moment is the way the fluffy curls of the lion’s mane seem to reference the way the daredevil child has a similar hairstyle. Both creatures also have a relaxed, eyes shut facial expression- a perfectly in sync team rather than two individuals interacting. The lion is missing some teeth to make him seem individual, while the child is about as blank as possible (not even a design or color on his clothes) to make him easy for any kid to relate to. It’s solid work, and I’d bet that more than a few adults would happily wear it.

Winners at Monsieur Poulet earn 2 Euros per item sold, for a total of up to 2000 Euros.

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