Archive | camiseteria

26 May 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Camiseteria’s A Realidade É Dura

A Realidade É Dura by Rodrigo Chinellato is one of those designs that comes very close to something special, but doesn’t quite hit the right mark. The problem is that while the situation is ripe for satire- large blocks of brick hanging in the sky are odd, and so is Mario’s ability to punch through them- the scene on the shirt feels very confusing. I’m unable to tell what is going on because the block’s location is so unclear. It doesn’t seem to be very high up at all, and the shadows seem to indicate that it’s stuck to the wall rather than floating. I guess Luigi’s trowel indicates that he’s put it there, but we have no clue as to why (and if those light lines are meant to feel like spider webs, it was a long time ago). Mario’s injury is just as perplexing. Did the bricks fall on him accidentally (the block doesn’t seem high enough for that to be likely) or did he somehow back into it (the wound appears to be on the back of his head)? And why is all of this happening indoors, rather than a hilly outdoor scene? It’s all very strange, and doesn’t quite add up to a punchline for me.

Camiseteria winners earn R$800 cash and R$500 in Camiseteria products.

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19 May 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Camiseteria’s The Duel of Titans

The Duel of Titans by Pedro Fernandes is definitely a design that puts awesomeness ahead of logic, and it’s a fun feeling. Seeing this giant shark and T-Rex locked in battle is such a powerful sight that it takes a minute before you start to question it and wonder where exactly this fight is taking place. On land the T-Rex has a clear advantage, but underwater it’s all about the shark… and where exactly are the meteors coming from? Maybe they’re in space. The details don’t matter, because whatever the case may be, it’s an intriguing matchup and something that’s neat to imagine. But while the battle itself is a success, I think some of the details aren’t at quite the same level. The title emphasizes the word The, which isn’t ideal- surely rephrasing that section as Duel of the Titans would allow for highlighting a more powerful word while also sounding more natural. And the Meteor Comics tag at the bottom left is a bit baffling, since none of the rest of the art feels like a comic book to me. I’d have much rather seen another meteor there.

Camiseteria winners earn R$800 cash and R$500 in Camiseteria products.

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14 May 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Camiseteria’s Vader Coffee

Vader Coffee by Jady Salvatico caters to those who like their coffee the way they like their force, on the dark side. I think the main thing that works in this design is how unexpected it is- it’s funny to think of this serious, villainous dude just suddenly emerging from your mug. It’s made even funnier because he’s so wedged in there (no room at all between those shoulders and the brim) and because he’s shown realistically rather than in cartoon style. It’s not just the spirit of the dark side that’s in your coffee, it’s this specific guy. Playing off that absurdity, the playful style of the text works to amplify the silliness. I like that a lot of different type styles are used, as this adds a lot of interest and the decorative, expressive look of it contrasts well with the straightforward and unadorned image below.

Camiseteria winners earn R$800 cash and R$500 in Camiseteria products.

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05 May 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Camiseteria’s Call Home

Call Home by Pedro Fernandes makes space seem very dangerous, posing a vulnerable astronaut in the middle of nowhere and about to be beset by a handful of speeding meteors. In a smart move, the artist positions the meteors as all coming from different directions- this isn’t just a meteor storm that he can duck his way through, he’s seemingly being targeted by this space debris. And as indicated by the reflection in his visor, there are even more meteors we can’t even see from our perspective! The loneliness of his plight is emphasized by the smallness and distance of the stars behind him, and even the far off planet looks empty and barren. In this moment of terror, there’s only one small solace- ET is there, offering the advice that the astronaut simply call home. His finger glows red, the only part of the design to stray from the palette of greens and yellows. But without a phone, or indeed any visible means of communication at all, ET’s suggestion is doomed to fail. Still, it’s nice to see this scared, lost alien from the movies in a situation where he can be confident and in control- even if the framing makes it seem like he’s probably just a figment of the astronaut’s imagination, one last burst of comfort and creativity before the meteors hit.

Camiseteria winners earn R$800 cash and R$500 in Camiseteria products.

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28 April 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Camiseteria’s Programmed to Love

Programmed to Love by Camila Matos positions its robotic hero as the ultimate bad boy, who has women swooning over his cool walk (crushing humans beneath his feet, of course) and the heat of his laser-vision gaze. But as the main portrait of him grasping a flower in his claw hand shows, he’s also sensitive! Probably. It’s a silly, fun-loving concept that I think a lot of robot fans will appreciate, and I like the way the mechanical, cold nature of the robot is highlighted in his huge, blank eyes and sharp, chunky build. I think the design feels very relevant right now because popular shows (like Westworld and Humans) are currently tackling the idea of robots with emotions, and seeing the same theme explored (even satirically) with a really clunky, metal creature instead of the attractive actors and actresses we’re used to feels even more ridiculous.

Camiseteria winners earn R$800 cash and R$500 in Camiseteria products.

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21 April 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Camiseteria’s Submarine

Submarine by Caio Uli Prado is a fun tribute to the Beatles, and specifically to their Yellow Submarine. I really like the way the yellow circles are handled. They feel authentically like bubbles, especially in the way they scatter and disperse at the top edge of each letter. The only other element is the submarines, which pack each letterform by replicating many times in different shades of yellow, some with red detailing and some without. For my tastes, the design is less strong because of its strict adherence to what the original yellow submarine looked like. Imagine how much more exciting and dynamic this might feel if instead, each submarine felt like a little discovery, packed with details that could give different machines differing personalities. Still, although this falls short from its potential, I do think the design is extremely wearable and should have plenty of appeal for Beatles fans.

Camiseteria winners earn R$800 cash and R$500 in Camiseteria products.

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14 April 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Camiseteria’s Zombies

Zombies by Leandro Dust is interesting because at least for me, the first thing that grabs my attention isn’t the zombies- it’s the ambiance and lighting! The shock of a blue and teal tinged stormy sky weighs heavily over the piece like a bad omen, cut through with shards of lightning that provide some illumination for the creepy gothic architecture and stumbling corpses. The zombie out front seems to loom right out of the borders of the artwork, casting him as a very real threat advancing towards the viewer. And although we can only see his eyes and outline, the artist does well in establishing him as inhuman by shifting his head so far off the center line and highlighting his missing hand. A couple of smaller zombies in the background help to fill in the blanks of the imagination, making it seem like the whole landscape might be teeming with these creatures. A perfectly frightening dark and stormy night!

Camiseteria winners earn R$800 cash and R$500 in Camiseteria products.

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