Archive | threadless

20 November 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Threadless’s Seasons: Winter design contest

Fall is on its way out, so Threadless‘s Seasons: Winter design competition arrives just in time! Here’s what they’re looking for…

Rather than preparing for ice zombies a la Game of Thrones, we want you to get in the spirit of the chilly season by creating a winter-inspired design! Create an all-over print that makes a latte mug look like it’s covered in frost. Submit an image of snow-dusted pine treetops that would be perfect on a warm sherpa blanket for chilly evenings. Or perhaps you have a photo of a gentle snowfall that would make an art print look like a window to a winter wonderland.

This contest opens to entries on November 24th, 2017 and ends on December 8th, 2017. One winner will earn $1000 cash (with more prizing to be announced on 11/24/17). Additionally, all designers printed will earn $1 minimum per item sold (learn more about Threadless artist payments).

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17 November 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Threadless: Quiet Night and more new this week

Quiet Night by Steven Rhodes (blue sparrow) is my favorite Threadless print this week. The concept is one any reader can easily relate to, because the visuals serve up the perfect conditions for losing yourself in a good book. There’s the piping hot cup of tea, a thick book with many pages to go, and an outdoor landscape that speaks to peaceful wilderness. It’s a setup that promises no interruptions. The loose illustration style also adds a lot to the idea, setting the scene with an understated nod to independence, creativity, and freedom from the precision of computers.

Sushi Lover by Graja (Graja) is one heck of a sight gag, starting the sequence with what looks like a set of chopsticks grasping a bundle of sushi… only to reveal in the last panel that the “sticks” are really a walrus’s tusks. I love the design because it captures how clumsy I feel when I try to use chopsticks- awkward as walruses are, I don’t doubt that this guy would still handle the dipping process more gracefully than I would. It’s also a piece that feels right because walruses really are fish eaters, so there’s something neat about seeing this fellow eat his favorite food in a more sophisticated way.

At the Record Store by Pigboom Kaboom (pigboom2014) constructs a very appealing scene, with anthropomorphized animals browsing the racks at a typical record store. It’s immediately relatable, outfitting each animal in an outfit that seems very much like what actual record store patrons might wear, right down to the pins on the dog’s shoulder bag and the stubble crowding the cat’s face. While often simplicity is best in shirt design, here the sheer amount of detail becomes an asset because it sends the viewer hunting through every corner of the illustration looking for hidden treasures, just like the record hunters the art depicts.

Stardust by John Tibbott (quick-brown-fox) uses the kind of bold minimalism that I love to see on a t-shirt. It’s a smart reimagining of Ziggy Stardust’s famed lightning bolt face paint that uses the bolt in place of one of the star’s points, creating a dynamic image reminiscent of a shooting star. The color palette is dead-on, so viewers will immediately make the Bowie connection. Solid work, and super-wearable.

Go Take a Hike by Michael Buxton (DinoMike) has a slogan that entices you to get out into the wild… and imagery that gives you a lot of reasons to stay inside. The result is a design that makes you feel like the animals have assembled to tell you to take a hike out of their territory, which is a fun sentiment. It also gives the animals a lot of implied personality, because when seen in that light the owl goes from merely watchful to stalking, the bear’s awkward smile becomes threateningly bared teeth, and the wolf starts to look awfully hungry. It’s a cute design that gets dark the more you look, and that’s the kind of shirt that is a lot of fun to wear.

Threadless prints new shirts every week, chosen from the designs submitted by and voted on by site members. Most winners earn $1 minimum per item sold (learn more about Threadless artist payments).

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14 November 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Threadless’s Artist Shops Accelerator

Threadless is making big moves with their Artist Shops Accelerator program, which plans to give away $100k to artists for the purpose of expanding their individual artist shops.

Get your application in before December 31st, 2017 for your chance to win. Four winners will be chosen, with each winner receiving their $25,000 in 12 equal monthly payments starting February 1st, 2018. Payments are contingent on meeting certain revenue goals.

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13 November 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Threadless’s Tattoo design contest

Threadless wants artists to think ink in their new Tattoo design competition. Here’s what they’re looking for…

Amazing tattoos are art pieces that stay with you forever. And for this challenge, we want you to create a tat-inspired design that’s as addicting to wear as these permanent creations are to get! Channel some of the most mind-blowing tattoo styles you’ve ever seen and let those be your guide; the classic Sailor Jerry Flash style, all-over sleeves that tell a story, the minimal or hyper-realistic ones – whatever gets you inspired!

This contest opens to entries on November 17th, 2017 and ends on December 1st, 2017. One winner will earn $1000 cash (with more prizing to be announced on 11/24/17). Additionally, all designers printed will earn $1 minimum per item sold (learn more about Threadless artist payments).

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10 November 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Threadless: Coping with Stress and more new this week

Coping with Stress by Steven Rhodes (blue sparrow) is my favorite Threadless print this week. The poor decision-making in the illustration is at once hilarious and also sadly relatable, especially because of the sheer awkwardness of trying to drink out of a coffee pot pitched at that angle. You can just tell this is going to end poorly, only adding to the stress. I love the choice to make the protagonist a diner waitress because it accomplishes so much at once- it’s a notoriously stressful occupation, it creates the opportunity to incorporate that perfectly retro uniform, and it even gives some added context to the coffee pot. All that means that even though all we see is some wood grain behind her, every viewer is imagining a bustling diner just out of the frame. Good stuff!

Ramen and Cats by Pepe Rodriguez (ppmid) is delightfully weird, in large part because of the open question of whether the cats are an ingredient in the ramen or just the consumers of it. Whatever the case may be, the cats seem very content with their fate as they slurp noodles and paw chopsticks. Their contentedness and glee is contagious, especially when paired with the design’s bright color palette. This is a design that quietly suggests that maybe you SHOULD play with your food, and it’s an appealing message.

Divide by Forrest D (ForrestMoon) won Threadless’s Asymmetry challenge, and it’s definitely a strong, memorable piece. The human face is what draws most of my attention, as its chiseled features literally look like they’ve been carved in stone, creating sharp edges and deep shadows. It’s a face that feels serious and solid, so seeing it explode into delicately rendered flowers makes quite a statement. It’s like seeing imagination, creativity, and freedom, especially because of how these blossoms also break through the rectangular frame. Apart from the excellent conceptual work, I also want to call attention to how much detail this design contains- little moments like the way each flower’s petals are captured and the skin has a subtle texture make this an illustration that feels rich and rewarding to look at over and over again.

Threadless prints new shirts every week, chosen from the designs submitted by and voted on by site members. Most winners earn $1 minimum per item sold (learn more about Threadless artist payments).

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06 November 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Threadless’s One Line design contest

Threadless is paring things down with a fresh art style for the One Line design challenge. Here’s what they’re looking for…

Anyone who’s ever played with an Etch A Sketch knows that one line can take you a long way. So we challenge you to embrace the art of turning a single line into something beautiful (minus the difficulty of using two plastic knobs to draw).

In honor of this challenge, here’s what you gotta do in just one line of writing: using one continuous line that never leaves the page, create anything from an all-over pattern that’s all connected to stylized hand lettering to an impressive portrait.

This contest opens to entries on November 10th, 2017 and ends on November 24th, 2017. One winner will earn $1000 cash (with more prizing to be announced on 11/10/17). Additionally, all designers printed will earn $1 minimum per item sold (learn more about Threadless artist payments).

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03 November 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Threadless: Frankencookie and more new this week

Frankencookie by Antonio Angel Centeno Guerrero (Tony Centeno) is my favorite Threadless print this week. Part of the site’s grand tradition of smart and silly designs featuring food with faces, this piece centers on a half-eaten gingerbread man who has been brought back to life (courtesy of a smart cookie) with pieces of other baked items in place of his missing parts. Part of the fun of this scenario is that to us, the gingerbread man is still the most human and real-seeming of the bunch- after all, he’s the only one in this crew who is meant to have a face. That makes him easy to root for, especially because the rage on the faces of the angry villager snacks is so pronounced. I do think there’s a slight missed opportunity in that the cookie’s pitchfork would have been funnier as an actual fork, but it’s still a fun design with a lot of depth and humor.

Law & Disorder by Cody Weiler (csweiler) won Threadless’s Chaos design competition, and its frantic, disassembled take on the American flag is certainly timely. The wear of the stripes, the disorganized piling of it all, and the scattering of stars communicate distress, which implies a political message about lack of cohesion within the country. What makes this a great shirt, though, is that chaos aside, this is a really attractive arrangement of elements. The strong angles created by the stripes direct the eye around in strange directions, and the various overlaps create interesting visual moments. I like that even the stars are a bit irregular, with different sized prongs that help make examining the details feel rewarding.

Threadless prints new shirts every week, chosen from the designs submitted by and voted on by site members. Most winners earn $1 minimum per item sold (learn more about Threadless artist payments).

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